Aunt Epp's Guide for Life: From Chastity to Copper Kettles, Musings of a Victorian Lady

Elspeth Marr Christopher Rush


Aunt Epp's Guide for Life: From Chastity to Copper Kettles, Musings of a Victorian Lady

Aunt Epp's Guide for Life: From Chastity to Copper Kettles, Musings of a Victorian Lady

  • Title: Aunt Epp's Guide for Life: From Chastity to Copper Kettles, Musings of a Victorian Lady
  • Author: Elspeth Marr Christopher Rush
  • ISBN: 9781843173434
  • Page: 137
  • Format: Hardcover



Elspeth Marr 1871 1947 also known as Aunt Epp was the great great aunt of acclaimed author Christopher Rush, who only knew her for two brief years before her death Long after Aunt Epp passed away Christopher s mother discovered the boxes of papers and diaries written by Aunt Epp to an unnamed young girl in her life, which now make up Aunt Epp s Guide For Ladies.Elspeth Marr 1871 1947 also known as Aunt Epp was the great great aunt of acclaimed author Christopher Rush, who only knew her for two brief years before her death Long after Aunt Epp passed away Christopher s mother discovered the boxes of papers and diaries written by Aunt Epp to an unnamed young girl in her life, which now make up Aunt Epp s Guide For Ladies Aunt Epp penned her life lessons, which form a fascinating glimpse of Victorian life, over sixty years Sassy and opinionated, Aunt Epp was not afraid to voice her views and give her advice on topics ranging from gingerbread to genitals, sheep s head to softening of the member , God to golden pippins In a time when mentioning such things would be deemed unladylike and improper nothing is left unsaid as Epp jots down her thoughts, recipes, herbal cures, sage advice and with fantastic wit and alacrity It is a true testament to the changing times that Epp s guide can now be published, enjoyed and put to use by everyone and that even by today s standards, no question is too squeamish for Epp s shrewd commentary.


Recent Comments "Aunt Epp's Guide for Life: From Chastity to Copper Kettles, Musings of a Victorian Lady"

This delicious little book is the collected wisdom of a Mrs Elspeth Marr, a Victorian wife writing for an unknown female. The advice is shockingly modern, wickedly funny, and very practical. I mean, the woman suggests sex as a cure for insomnia! (Unless one is unmarried. Then she suggests onions.)Books like this are a lovely reminder that free thinkers have always been around, that women -- regardless of era -- possess great wisdom, and humans always suffer sleepless nights!

I'm deeply skeptical about this, and I can't articulate precisely why. Not because I disbelieve that a Victorian could hold these opinions, certainly not. But there's something I don't know, precious, something that smacks of patting old ladies on the head here. "Look how cute my old auntie was, so modern talking about sex and wine!" Meh.The whole book made me roll my eyes. I want more back story, more information about Elspeth, more context. More than darling little opinions on how shoving a ho [...]

In ordine alfabeticoQuesta raccolta di pensieri di una "lady vittoriana", come recita la copertina, procede in ordine alfabetico, partendo da Abbigliamento e finendo con Zuppa di pesce.Così, a titolo di esempio, ad Abbigliamento seguono:B come Baci (dopo aver mangiato aglio);C come Calli;D come Diarrea;E come Emorroidi;F come Flatulenza;G come Ginocchio della cameriera;e così via.Vi pare una lettura interessante?No, neanche a me.Perciò arrivata - per tigna - a pagina 145 di 183, questo libro [...]

What a strange collection of advice. Everything from how to use your boobs to their advantage to how to avoid a ghost in a mirror. I appreciated the book in its context (coming from a women in the 19th century) but I wanted to have more background information on the women writing the advice. Who was she? Were these unique thoughts for her day? Where did she learn this information? Why should I care?

An absolutely wonderful little book. Some of the entries make me suspect that it is not all as 'period' as it might be and then others display that beautiful Victorian/Edwardian insanity that can come from nowhere else. Heartily recommended as a good giggle and an insight in to the mind of this truly astounding lady.

I gave this one up shortly into it. For one thing, the anecdotes in it really aren't that funny. The nephew says in his forward that not all the stories are even hers. The hyped up description is misleading. Methinks letters "adapted from sources" equals an editor who made stuff up.Secondly the format is very dictionary and impersonal. I would have so much rather read these bit of her letters in the context of a whole letter. I can imagine it would have opened her up as a character and would hav [...]

An entertaining read.

"Engaging, frank and utterly delightful -- the irresistible compilation of one forthright Victorian lady's opinions and sage advice on every conceivable subject."Adultery, bunions, evolution, and garlic: these are just a few of the toics that Christopher Rush's great-great aunt Elspeth Marr expounded upon in a series of lifelong musings that were shockingly frank and progressive for her time."Born in 1871, Elspeth Marr was married but childless (perhaps by choice) and lived in the Kingdom of Fif [...]

3.5 stars.I have to say, I definitely prefer this ‘How to be a Woman’ guide to Caitlin Moran’s How to be a Woman.I am unsure of how to rate this book because I am unsure of its authenticity: I can see that others have already given negative reviews because they doubt that the opinions are genuinely coming down from a ‘Victorian Lady’ as the cover claims, but I remain agnostic (view spoiler)[Aunt Epp would approve, it seems (hide spoiler)], because I feel I want to believe that there ha [...]

This is a fascinating book, filled with all kinds of tidbits from a woman who held decided views of life. Born in 1871 in Scotland, she lived until 1947. Her notebook was discovered years after her death by a great-niece and edited into this book by a great-great nephew.Aunt Epp obviously did not suffer fools gladly, she relished living life to its fullest, and she was willing to share what she knew.Want to know what kind of wood to burn in your fireplace? Ask Aunt Epp. (Don't burn wet elm.)Need [...]

Not so sure all of this is authentic, if so, this late Victorian lady is remarkably modern and enlightened, if not a little obsessed with sex. From how to make a decent Welsh Rarebit, we also hear the best way to stop a husband's jealousy over a new born is to encourage him to suckle breast-milk. Seriously.Have to say I do agree with her demolition of Jane Austen as being empty-headed and playing spillykins whilst men were dying on the fields of Waterloo and also her demolition of aetheists as b [...]

An interesting concept for a book: a Victorian lady offering her thoughts on an assortment of topics from the scatological to the eschatological. But since the snippets were pulled from letters and other sources, the organization felt forced, and context was lost at many points. Despite the few tantalizing paragraphs here and there, overall it was a dull collage of out-of-context ideas and advice.

A quick and easy (and sassy) read. I borrowed this from the library and enjoyed it so much I plan on purchasing my own copy at my local bookstore. Lots of amusing and interesting advice, some very closely related to the period in which it was written, some just as relevant today as it was back then (maybe even more so). I envision having this book sitting on my desk and popping it open a few times a week for a quick moment of wisdom (and a giggle to go along with it).

Often funny, sometimes poignant musings on life and all its varied ingredients from the journals of a nineteenth century woman. Sometimes she seems fixated with subjects like farts and infidelity, but there are plenty of words of wit and wisdom - not to mention scary-sounding herbal rememdies - for whatever ails us sprinkled liberally throughout this delightful little book.

I wonder how in the world she came up across some of her methods. For example-the restoring old readings and impotencewhat would make you think of that.I think I would have liked her. SHe seemed to be open-minded and respected everyone. She did not think she was better than anyone else. Its interesting to read that she dealt with many of the issues we deal with in the modern day.

There were some shocking journal entries (the use of female urine as an aphrodisiac - this Scottish woman was born in the late 1800's) and some amazingly wise, modern entries about living life well. However, they were intermingled with so many Scottish herbal recipes for curing common maladies that a reader may stop reading the book before even getting to them.

Typical Christmas book really, although some bits were interesting from the point of view of her out-of-time open-mindedness and clarity. Who says all Victorian women were staid and prudish?Perhaps could've done with fewer tips on how to put various herbs, leaves and vegetables where the sun don't shine.

Aunt Epp certainly charms, although I have to admit that her (all too frequent) advice on the many wonderful uses of urine is a bit odd. Still, interesting for its insight into the women who bridged the gap between the Victorian world and the modern one.

A surprising and curious read, really a dip into kind of book. I would have found it more informative to see dates attached to some of these entries in order to give a better historical and cultural context. A good read.

This is great!!!Feeling down? Look something up in here, and you'll find Aunt Epp helping you through your bad times.And the recipes!! Even if we can't find some of the ingredients, if you're a crazy cookbook fan like me, you'll know just how much fun it is to imagine making the recipe.

Aunt Epp was before her time! What an interesting woman- very forthright and honest. Funny, too! She definitely is not the stereotypical Victorian lady we expect- I would have loved to have met her.

This book was funny, and had me laughing at some parts but also wrinkling up my nose in disgust at other parts. LOL!

meh. Not a great book at all I kept getting the feeling that if I searched around the internet enough Oprah would tell me it is a fake. And if it was a fake it was a terrible bore of a fake :\

This book was at turns amusing and earthy, old-fashioned and surprisngly modern. I think Aunt Epp would have been a lot of fun to have a glass of wine with!

ganz nett, aber auch nicht wirklich mehr ein Buch für den "Coffeetable". Aber hergeben werde ich das Buch trotz allem nicht.

Ok, some interesting perspectives, but found myself getting a little bored towards the end.

Hilariousazy old auntie write advice.


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    Posted by:Elspeth Marr Christopher Rush
    Published :2018-09-04T15:43:00+00:00