The Mysteries of Pittsburgh

Michael Chabon Milan Bozic


The Mysteries of Pittsburgh

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh

  • Title: The Mysteries of Pittsburgh
  • Author: Michael Chabon Milan Bozic
  • ISBN: 9780061687570
  • Page: 236
  • Format: Paperback



The enthralling debut from bestselling novelistMichael Chabon is a penetrating narrative of complexfriendships, father son conflicts, and the awakening of a young man s sexualidentity Chabon masterfully renders the funny,tender, and captivating first person narrative of Art Bechstein,whose confusion and heartache echo the tones of literary forebears like The Catcher in thThe enthralling debut from bestselling novelistMichael Chabon is a penetrating narrative of complexfriendships, father son conflicts, and the awakening of a young man s sexualidentity Chabon masterfully renders the funny,tender, and captivating first person narrative of Art Bechstein,whose confusion and heartache echo the tones of literary forebears like The Catcher in the Rye s HoldenCaulfield and The Great Gatsby s NickCarraway TheMysteries of Pittsburgh incontrovertibly established Chabonas a powerful force in contemporary fiction, even before his PulitzerPrize winning novel The AmazingAdventures of Kavalier Clay set theliterary world spinning An unforgettable story of coming of age in America, itis also an essential milestone in the movement of American fiction, from anovelist who has become one of the most important and enduring voices of thisgeneration.


Recent Comments "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh"

Like most stellar first novels, this one has that autobiographic vibe that perhaps the writer's future novels will only bravely hint at. This one is a coming out story, basically. The protagonist is gay, bi, experimenting. There are overly-masculine (gay) symbols throughout which obviously take no great psychoanalyst to pry open: mysterious men in motorbikes, gangsters, gaming, the faraway suburbs seeming faraway dreams that'll never be. The world so fully inhabited by BRET EASTON ELLIS is likew [...]

So, I loved this book, and kind of wanted it to be my life, the way certain people I could name but won't feel about The Sun Also Rises. I was about fifty pages in, tops, before I found myself casting the movie in my head. (I deliberately avoided looking at the cast list until after I finished reading the book; thank god I did, I would have liked the book, I estimate, about 46% less had I know while reading it that Mena Suvari plays Phlox. Appalling.) Or, to be honest, imagining myself as the le [...]

Michael Chabon can write one hell of a novel. This one is his first but has so much poise and wisdom. And it has the added bonus of being immensely readable and not bogged down with super obscure words like some of his work. I gobbled it up.

I, like tons of other goodreaders, wish we didn't have to give a book an entire star so really I rate this at a three and a half more than a four.In any event, I know that I liked this book, I'm just not sure how much I liked it or why I liked it. I mean, if a book holds your attention to the point where you can finish it quickly and are interested in picking it up everyday does that by itself make it a great book? Or a really good book? Because this book was that for me. Then again, some really [...]

I've read this book three times. I'm trying to decide exactly what it is that I love so much about it. Michael Chabon's writing style makes me long for such skill. I get an ache in my stomach reading his works and loving them so much and wishing his words could come from me. The characters in this book aren't wonderful people, but they are wonderfully real. Art's lack of self-confidence especially speaks to me. When Art falls in love with Arthur I fell in love with Arthur right along with him. I [...]

Now what a masterful writer is this! Very precise and compelling with beautiful convincing descriptions. When I came across the following lines I had to stop reading, flabbergasted by what must be the best paragraph I read in years:"Before she committed suicide, when he was seventeen, Cleveland Arning's mother, a laughing woman, taught her son to joke and to ridicule. His father, tall, thin, cut his beard in a goatee and wore great red sideburns that ran up his otherwise bald temples. His name w [...]

I bought this book many years ago while actually in Pittsburgh. I was visiting a girlfriend who was living there, and shortly after my arrival I was unceremoniously dumped.Browsing the street of the unfamiliar town I was supposed to spend the next 3 days in, I stumbled upon this book. Based on title alone it seemed an appropriate subject, given my recent circumstance. I imagined myself sitting and reading for days at a bench on the Monongahela, forlornly pondering life's intricacies. Instead I w [...]

This book is my new personal favorite. Mostly because of this quote,"Every woman is a volume of stories, a catalogue of movements, a spectacular array of images."The other quotes I like are:“There had been a time in high school, see, when I wrestled with the possibility that I might be gay, a torturous six-month culmination of years of unpopularity and girllessness. At night I lay in bed and coolly informed myself that I was gay and that I had better get used to it.”“It was as though she h [...]

As this novel opens, two contradictory worlds quickly coalesce around Arthur Bechstein, freshly minted college graduate. The first is uninspired and conventional. The second is filled with open-ended, over-sized, impractical possibilities.Art Bechstein has lived a sheltered life ever since his mother died when he was 13. His college major in economics attests to the kind of level-headed direction a father would approve of. (A paper on Sigmund Freud's sexual nose fetish tells us where his real in [...]

A contemporary novel about a young man who graduates from college and spends a summer wandering about Pittsburgh. Art, our protagonist, struggles to decide between his male and female lovers, and he also attempts to navigate a risky relationship with his money laundering father, who happens to get involved with one of Art's new friends, Cleveland, an intelligent and disillusioned biker. Throughout all of these relationships Art gets closer to discovering what makes him himself, the most puzzling [...]

This was Michael Chabon's first novel. He was in his early twenties when it was published. It was widely praised. While many of the critics focused on the sexual ambiguities of the main character, what Chabon clearly showed here was his gift, to this day undiminished, for giving architectural landscape a personality.In every Chabon novel or story I've read, manmade structures give meaning to the characters' actions. If I exaggerate, then allow me to clarify what I'm saying. Are the characters in [...]

Oh my. I could read this again and again. I've been saying this tons of times, but I'm certain that the reading experience will always change, will always morph into something else. Every sentence breathes. It's so beautifully written, and many times I find myself pausing just to savor the beauty of it. Here are some quotes that I like:“I saw that I'd been mistaken when I thought of myself as a Wall, because a wall stands between, and holds apart, two places, two worlds, whereas, if anything, [...]

I'll be generous.This book did not capture me. The writing felt amateur in ways that stunned me. I remember feeling lost in Kavalier and Clay, floating on wave after wave of blindingly gorgeous sentences, paragraphs, so complex and bold that you couldn't help but feel an awesome seasickness. Here, though, the writing is just plain old insecure. Chabon plays it like a coward, and Art sounds like a boring crybaby who we end up not liking that much because, well, he can't write fo shit.Not that the [...]

This is what I call the "It was summer and we were young" school of youthful indiscretion and confused attempts at living the Full Life. The story is filled to the max with sexual confusion, societal yearning and emotional tug of war between what the protagonist calls his beautiful god-like people -- all put together in a sleepy, yellow-warm and lyrical package. I had a little difficulty buying into some of the situations and characters and I'm not entirely certain the ending had been built up e [...]

What a stupid book. The writing is uncreative and dull, the plot is close to non-existent, and sweet jesus do I ever hate these characters. All that, and an unsettling number (well, three) of sudden and sloppy accounts of buttsex. I will give credit to the early scene of the party at the Iranian woman's home and the final few paragraphs, but the ~270 pages in between are simply not worth the time.

Might I just say that over the last few days I’ve found it intensely irritating when anything has come between this book and me. Suckered in from the opening sentences:At the beginning of the summer I had lunch with my father, the gangster, who was in town for the weekend to transact some of his vague business. We’d just come to the end of a period of silence and ill will – a year I’d spent in love with and in the same apartment as an odd, fragile girl whom he had loathed, on sight, with [...]

My fourth Chabon work in a row after having read Final Solution, Model World, and Werewolves in their Youth in the past few weeks. Thankfully, this is the last of his early works for me to read, since I don’t know how much more unpolished Chabon I can take. Mysteries is Chabon’s first published work, his master’s thesis at Cal-Irvine. The book takes place in Pittsburgh at an unnamed college, and revolves around a college student named Art Bechstein whose father is a Jewish gangster. Art me [...]

Take a dull boy in a dull city during a dull, liminal summer. Not an adult but soon-to-be, not really anything yet but certain he will be. The Mysteries of Pittsburgh begins at this doorway and records Art Bechstein’s quest for a summer of whimsy and profundity that will change him for the better. June finds Art making fantastic new friends who all seem to know how to live better than he does. Inspired, Art sits atop a hill in Pittsburgh and thinks this:I smoked and looked down at the bottom o [...]

‘Los misterios de Pittsburgh’ fue la primera novela de Michael Chabon, y en ella se encuentra el germen de lo que es su magnífica carrera literaria. Sin ser una novela redonda, sí contiene la suficiente calidad como para convertirla en una lectura imprescindible para comprender lo que serían las siguientes obras de Chabon, sobre todo ‘Chicos prodigiosos’ y la obra maestra que es ‘Las asombrosas aventuras de Kavalier y Clay’, ganadora del Pulitzer, sin olvidar sus excelentes relato [...]

The only other Michael Chabon book I have read is The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, but that was enough to put him on my radar in a big way. In picking up this book, I was going back to his very early work, a coming-of-age-in-a-hot-summer tale of sexuality and transgression.Note: The rest of this review has been withheld due to the changes in policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook

I saw the awful adaptation of this book recently and was so impressed by the tone of the piece and what lay at the heart of the mess they made they I immediately decided that the book should be moved to the top of my to be read list. Now I can safely say that it was an adaptation in names and places only yet the tone and heart was lost in a different type of mess.Perhaps mess is too strong a word for describing the book, I just couldn't connect with it and didn't really care about what I was rea [...]

There's something bittersweet about delving into a favourite author's early work. It's pretty exciting to see how an author has grown over the years; what talents they always had, what weaknesses they have or haven't lost, which aspects were seeded long before they were developed.But on the other, more emotive and less rational, hand; what tainted greatness, how boringly humanising, how utterly demythologising. I mean, it's really comfortable to believe that greatness is something separate, inhe [...]

I went to add this book and couldn't remember the title, in spite of having just finished it this month. That's a good approximation of my experience with The Mysteries of Pittsburgh--pretty forgettable. It's one of those moody books set in a roughly indiscriminate time period (it's clear from the text that it's supposed to be some point between 1980 and 1990, but the way it's written it could easily be 1920or 50or 72) that's primarily concerned with characterization and not really interested in [...]

Holy hell Where to start? I picked this book out of a library shelf by pure coincidence; the only reason why it caught my eye was because I happened to be watching a television show at the time that was set in Pittsburgh. Flipping it around, I skimmed over the critiques and read " it will find its place beside 'On the Road' and 'The Catcher in the Rye'". That's all it took for me to take it over to the cash register.Michael Chabon, what a genius. The way the book is written reminds you of just h [...]

I don't know. I guess i'm not particularly taken by coming-of-age stories written from the p.o.v. of rich white kids. This doesn't imply that Art Bechstein's life had no conflict, but the Real characters in this book for me were Arthur & Cleveland. I felt really trapped behind Art's dribble ESPECIALLY as he describes his job at "Boardwalk Books" & i cringed with loathing during nearly every paragraph about his stupid girlfriends.This book was compared to A Catcher in the Rye, a book i fo [...]

I absolutely loved this book and would have finished it within a day or two, had it not been for a spoiler I accidentally stumbled upon regarding a character death. Because of that, the last 50 or so pages took me ages to get through; I really didn't want that particular character to meet his end, though now that I think of it, there was a good amount of foreshadowing in the beginning and middle of the book.I grew up just outside Pittsburgh and am going to school here, so all of the places menti [...]

An amazingly fast and fun coming-of-age novel about sex and friendship. Perhaps I speak in hindsight but it almost feels like Chabon is forcing himself to write Realist/Respectable Fiction instead of Good Fiction, and has to suppress his skills here and there. It's still an enriching and entertaining book.

I smoked and looked down at the bottom of Pittsburgh for a little while, watching the kids playing tiny baseball, the distant figures of dogs snatching at a little passing car, a miniature housewife on her back porch shaking out a snippet of red rug, and I made a sudden, frightened vow never to become that small, and to devote myself to getting bigger and bigger and bigger.The Mysteries of Pittsburgh was given to me by one of my best friends in the world, and reading it while keeping its signifi [...]

"Some people really know how to have a good time" There are books that so (seemingly) effortlessly capture the world in which they are written that you feel you are living, breathing, and sharing the air with the characters. The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Michael Chabon's first novel and completed to fulfil his master's requirement at the age of twenty-four, is such a book. I lived all 240 glorious pages - and when I wasn't reading I was daydreaming and dreaming about Art Bechenstein's (the narrat [...]

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh by Michael Chabon, Harper Perennial, New York, 2005The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, first novel by young author Michael Chabon, is a coming of age story that tells the tale of Art Bechstein, a recent college graduate trying to find his way the summer before entering the real world. Art I unsure of where he wants to go in life and determined to distance himself from his family. His father is a Jewish money launderer and gangster, a fact that brings Art deep feelings of sha [...]


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    Published :2018-08-07T21:04:54+00:00