Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights

Steven Levingston


Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights

Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights

  • Title: Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights
  • Author: Steven Levingston
  • ISBN: 9780316267373
  • Page: 255
  • Format: ebook



Kennedy and King traces the emergence of two of the twentieth century s greatest leaders, their powerful impact on each other and on the shape of the civil rights battle between 1960 and 1963 These two men from starkly different worlds profoundly influenced each other s personal development Kennedy s hesitation on civil rights spurred King to greater acts of courage, andKennedy and King traces the emergence of two of the twentieth century s greatest leaders, their powerful impact on each other and on the shape of the civil rights battle between 1960 and 1963 These two men from starkly different worlds profoundly influenced each other s personal development Kennedy s hesitation on civil rights spurred King to greater acts of courage, and King inspired Kennedy to finally make a moral commitment to equality As America still grapples with the legacy of slavery and the persistence of discrimination, Kennedy and King is a vital, vivid contribution to the literature of the Civil Rights Movement.


Recent Comments "Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights"

A man does what he must, in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers and pressure and that is the basis of all human morality.Over the last few days I've heard people repeatedly say "This country is better than this" But Is it?The events of this book took place over fifty years ago and yet they also took place over the weekend. Maybe America isnt better than this. Maybe this is America. America is judged on its actions. Around the world we are seen as a beacon of democra [...]

This was the first book I read in 2018. This subject is not new or foreign to me in the least bit. It was released last year but all the same I knew I had to read it the first time I laid eyes on it. Suffice to say I was not in the least bit disappointed.John Kennedy is my hero. There - I've said it, I've put it out there. There is nothing that anyone can say that would make me hate him or stop idolizing himever. (OK, the fact that he cheated on Jackie upsets me to no end but I've managed to sti [...]

Finished: 01 November 2017Genre: non-ficiton, historyScore: AReview: I read and listened to this book. The audio brought the story to life with the whisperered voices of Jackie Kennedy and Coretta King, JFK’s Boston Kennedy accent, MLK’s booming preaching voice and Governor John Patterson of Alabama as the snarling white segregationist. This book shone light on the shadows in my own memories of the 1960's. Steven Levingston’s Kennedy and King is masterpiece of historical narrative. Every p [...]

If you've read the Taylor Branch histories and other Civil Rights histories, there's not much new here, but this is still a great read about the evolution of these two men. Well, it's more about the evolution of Kennedy than King, but the latter was instrumental in it I suppose. I also don't like histories of Civil Rights written as though the 64 and 65 Acts were a fait complit. Not by a longshot. Still, read this one. And may more come out. Maybe a Johnson and Abernathy or a Johnson and King. M [...]

It's a masterpiece indeed!

"I don't care if the United States gets the first man on the moon, if while this is happening on a crash basis, we dawdle along here on our corner of the earth, nursing our prejudices, flouting our magnificent Constitution, ignoring the central moral problem of our times, and appearing hypocrites to all the world."**Not exactly apart of the review but if you're interested there is a song that perfectly exemplifies the quote above. Gil Scott-Heron sang a poem "Whitey on the Moon" in 1970 in respo [...]

Informative, readable and convicting. Finished the book with even more respect for Dr. King and all of the other civil rights activists like Harry Belafonte, James Baldwin, John Lewis, Fred Shuttlesworth, Jackie Robinson, and so many more.

Great book on understanding the differences between these two pivotal leaders in history.

I could not put this book down. I knew many of the bits and pieces of history related to these two prominent American figures but this book really brought it all together for me. I learned so much and feel the Civil Rights struggle so much more deeply as a result. This all happened not so long ago and I am clearer now on why our country still has so much work to do.

Excellent book about the civil rights era.Although I was a kid then and thought I remembered a lot, reading this book I realized I really didn't take in that much at the time.For example, I didn't know that King had used child protestors in Birmingham.Or the extent and ferocity of the violence. And how the protestors, while non-violent, basically put themselves in positions where there would be violence against them in order to get attention from the white establishment, especially the Kennedys, [...]

I love this book. It's very well-written, and fills in some gaps in my knowledge of the civil rights struggle during the early 1960's. I was a supporter of JFK when he was running in the Democratic primary in Wisconsin, as a member of the Marquette Young Democrats. The author follows his progression as a person mainly interested in international relations but a strong supporter of human rights in his heart, to one who learns of the abominations committed against his fellow human beings in a more [...]

Kennedy and King offers the reader a new take on both men, a rare dual biography that sets the stage with the main issue that brings both men to the center being civil rights.However, this new take largely treads over a lot of older ground. Kennedy and King is certainly a well-researched, well-written, and well put-together read about the two men coupled with their roles in shaping the Civil Rights Movement of the early 1960s. Most of the details included here have been discussed elsewhere in fa [...]

Amazing! Read this book! This book has touched me as no other book covering this material has. Extraordinary. I didn't think this at first, the start seems pretty low key and not inspirational. The accounting of the transformation in Kennedy is fascinating. I have read other books about civil rights in the 60's including Taylor Branch's excellent work, but this book moved me and stays with me in ways that others haven't. It may be particularly meaningful to me in light of events in this country [...]

The looks at both these men struck me as incredibly honest. Their strengths and their flaws, the things they did right and their mistakes, were covered. The events described were, for the most part, horrific. This author did an amazing job at writing something that came out readable, captivating, and informative. I learned a lot about these two men, the movement, and others who were involved. The lessons here are so important, not just historically. This stuff matters now. This was an amazing bo [...]

Wonderful Story!This book gives a good presentation to all the events leading up to the passage of the major civil rights legislation of the 1960s. I found the detailed accounts of personal conflicts and eventual affection of the primary personalities extremely interesting. Although I was familiar with the many murders that occurred in reaching civil rights goals, I was a little disappointed in the cursory coverage of what went behind them. The book was still an exciting narration of a major per [...]

One of the best non-fiction books I've read in a long time. Levingston does a fabulous job in telling interesting short stories about both Kennedy and King as their lives intersect at the crossroads of morality, racism, the law, and civil rights. I'd suggest this book should be on a short list of must reads related to the civil rights struggle. Particularly in the day of Trump; with a vast number of milleniums and often their parents that no so little about this critical component of American hi [...]

I was 10 years old during much of this book's story. And I remember very little of the details first hand. As hard as it was to stop reading, for any reason, it was still difficult to accept that this was part of America's past. I sure hope we Americans will maintain an awareness of our history -- the good and the bad. It can be so simple to repeat those same mistakes -- in the same old way or in another.

NYT book review did not fail me this time. This book is outstanding. I read it in 24 hours. I couldn't put it down. I've read books on JFK before. Never anything on MLK. I want to read more on King now. This book is expertly written, the pages simply fly by. I also leaned little pieces of history unknown to me before. The man reason I like non-fiction is being better informed. This book did that easily. I heartedly recommend this well-written and I grossing book.

Perfect source material for a study group on the relationship between Kennedy and King and the birth of the non-violent Civil Rights movement. How courageous those marchers, bus drivers, and students were. I lived through this period (although I was a high school student and pretty self-involved) and knew so little of what was going on nationally. Eye opening.

Everyone should read this book should be mandatory reading for high school students to have a picture of the civil rights era. So well done. It is painstaking to read, but well worth the effort. It will make our population understand why the Afro-Americans are still having to kneel for the National Anthem, etc. Great reference book, too!

If I could give this book 7 stars, I would. I thought it was a fascinating read, if a bit long, about the history of civil rights and how these 2 great leaders felt challenged and improved with the time!

What becomes immensely apparent is how little we as a country learn from the past and how easy it is for some to drag us back to the days in this books, screaming about states' rights and Confederate heritage all the way.

Compelling. Even though I had lived through much of this history, it kept me turning the page to remember what happened next. New insight into the developing relationship between two of the most significant figures of the twentieth century. Very well written and quite readable.

Excellent read!

This book enthralled me. While lack of moral commitment and empathy is an incredible problem today, this books traces the story of Kennedy's development of it. Required reading.

I would give this book six stars if would permit it

The book kennedy and King was a great book. It explained the relationship between the two men.

Excellent read and captivating.

Wonderful read.

The author does very well to present the 1960's mindset and describe the evolvement of JFK's empathy and commitment. Great overall perspective and survey of the Civil Rights movement.


  • ↠ Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights || ✓ PDF Read by ☆ Steven Levingston
    255 Steven Levingston
  • thumbnail Title: ↠ Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights || ✓ PDF Read by ☆ Steven Levingston
    Posted by:Steven Levingston
    Published :2018-011-19T09:46:12+00:00