Hopi Summer: Letters from Ethel to Maud

Carolyn O'Bagy Davis


Hopi Summer: Letters from Ethel to Maud

Hopi Summer: Letters from Ethel to Maud

  • Title: Hopi Summer: Letters from Ethel to Maud
  • Author: Carolyn O'Bagy Davis
  • ISBN: 9781933855080
  • Page: 246
  • Format: Paperback



The true story of a special cross cultural friendship In 1927 Maud Melville, a wealthy New Englander, and Ethel Muchvo, a Hopi potter, struck up a remarkable friendship Using diaries, letters, and photographs of Ethel and Maud, biographer and historian Carolyn O Bagy Davis delves into the touching relationship that blossomed between two very different women over many yeaThe true story of a special cross cultural friendship In 1927 Maud Melville, a wealthy New Englander, and Ethel Muchvo, a Hopi potter, struck up a remarkable friendship Using diaries, letters, and photographs of Ethel and Maud, biographer and historian Carolyn O Bagy Davis delves into the touching relationship that blossomed between two very different women over many years of triumphs and sorrows The story of Ethel and Maud also documents a bygone time in Native American history, a Hopi summer before wrenching change came to the traditional Pueblo world of the Hopi 60 b w photos.


Recent Comments "Hopi Summer: Letters from Ethel to Maud"

Hopi/Anglo interaction before it was easy to get to the mesas (starting in 1927). Excruciating portrait of how hard life was for the Indians. Though I don't think they would have agreed, by the end I really felt the anglo "friends" were exploiting as well as helping. I love the book until about 1/2 way thru, then it just made me sad.

3.5 I thought the idea of a road trip around the US in 1927 was quite ambitious AND it was completed! I liked how the story was told because if it was the actual letters I might have tossed the book mid way through the first letter. I'm glad for sticking it out and learning more about the Hopi and how the missionaries tried to completely destroy these people with their Christian ways.

Mildly interesting. The title is a bit misleading, as there are really only a few fragments of the letters included in the book, and is mostly the author's own conclusions.

In a way, this book only has only half of the story, since Maud's letters to Ethel did not survive. It would have been interesting to compare the different trajectories of their lives after their brief meeting in the summer of 1927. The life of a New England college professor's wife was so very different than that of a Hopi potter's stark struggle to survive.The book starts with a description of the tough cross country trek of Maud, her husband Cary and their young children in a Model T Ford on [...]

In the 1920s Maud takes a year-long car trip with her husband and teenage children around the perimeter of the United States. At a stop in Arizona at the Hopi reservation, Maud meets Ethel, a Hopi potter, and falls in love with the southwest and Hopi arts and culture. The two women become friends and maintain a correspondence and a sort of economic interdependence for years -- Ethel sells and gives packages of her pottery and traditional food to Maud who gives lectures back east on Hopi culture; [...]

A solid 3.5 stars.I saw this book at the library and was intrigued by the idea of a family's road trip around the US in 1927 that included the Arizona country and other areas in the Western US. The book explores a friendship - between a white woman from New England and a Hopi woman from Arizona - that developed because of this journey.I thoroughly enjoyed the first part of this book, which provided details on the Melville's travels (along with pictures of their Model T loaded down), much better [...]

I just never really cared for any of the characters I guess. The only thing I ever felt bad for were the eagles. I felt like there were three things that happened throughout the book and no matter what page you were on, they were talking about either:1) A bad harvest2) Someone needed something, please send 3) Someone was sick and/or dying/diedThe missionaries were beyond annoying and I got sick the instant they were around.I don't think the author did an overally good job organizing her thoughts [...]

In 1927 a family takes an auto trip around the USA. In Hopi Land in northern AZ, they stay a week with the Hopi and a friendship begins between Ethel (Hopi) and Maud (traveler). The book is written based on the letters between the two women over the next decade. Not as good as I thought it might be and the REAL story would have been the auto trip in those days along with 3 kids in tow. Wouldn't recommend unless a desire for more knowledge of the HOpi in the early 20th century.

2.5 stars. Some interesting bits of history but the way the info was put together made me kind of bored. I'm rating a 3 because if nothing else, the "missionaries" left quite an impression on me; irritation. I think they had no business being there trying to convert these people. I also don't think the friendship between Ethel & Maud was genuine. I'm sure it was for Ethel, but I think Maud exploited her.

The culture of these two women could not have been much farther apart. They met in an unlikely place and time and carried on an exchange for years. Each lived a lifetime of Service to Others rather than one of Service to Self. They were shining examples of what it truly means to be aware of the needs of others and then to provide whatever one could. The author placed me there with her words and photos.

I picked up this book at a Grand Canyon gift store while on vacation. I really enjoyed the first half, about Maud's family and their cross-country trip in 1927, before highways and hotels. The second half bogged down for me. I would have enjoyed reading the actual letters, rather than just the author's narration and excerpts from the letters.

The Hopi woman, Ethel, is positive, warm, and loving despite almost daily trials caused by poverty, hunger, and chronic illness. The letters convey her primary concern: looking out for her family. She does so much with very little, and she has endless gratitude for any help she recieves.

My daughter lives in the Phoenix, AZ, area. I saw the book was a ONEBOOKAZ 2011 Winner so I wanted to read it and then pass it on to her. I am intrigued by Native American culture. I thought it was interesting.

Edited letters between a white woman who visited a Hopi reservation and the Hopi woman she became friends with. While a little bit of background was helpful, there was more than needed and not enough of the actual letters, especially those from the Hopi woman.

Really interesting.

Sorry, too boring

I was disappointed that there were so few real excerpts from the letters, but the window into the lives of Hopis in the 1920s was a rare view. The book is written simply and includes many photos.

Interesting. Wish I wasn't going to have to miss our bookclub discussion of it. Ethel was an amazing woman!

Just didn't do it for me. The letters were I don't know, not that well organized, didn't have enough link between them, etc.

I didn't particularly like the book and writing style, but I learned a lot from the content and really enjoyed the conversation it inspired at book club.


  • Unlimited [Religion Book] ✓ Hopi Summer: Letters from Ethel to Maud - by Carolyn O'Bagy Davis Ó
    246 Carolyn O'Bagy Davis
  • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Religion Book] ✓ Hopi Summer: Letters from Ethel to Maud - by Carolyn O'Bagy Davis Ó
    Posted by:Carolyn O'Bagy Davis
    Published :2018-09-11T13:06:22+00:00