Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class

Larry Tye


Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class

Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class

  • Title: Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class
  • Author: Larry Tye
  • ISBN: 9780805078503
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Paperback



A lively and engaging chronicle that adds yet another dimension to the historical record The Boston GlobeWhen George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistible They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, A lively and engaging chronicle that adds yet another dimension to the historical record The Boston GlobeWhen George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistible They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, concierge, nanny, and occasionally doctor and undertaker to cars full of white passengers, making the Pullman Company the largest employer of African Americans in the country by the 1920s.Drawing on extensive interviews with dozens of porters and their descendants, Larry Tye reconstructs the complicated world of the Pullman porter and the vital cultural, political, and economic roles they played as forerunners of the modern black middle class Rising from the Rails provides a lively and enlightening look at this important social phenomenon.


Recent Comments "Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class"

This book discusses the Pullman porters and how they became the Black middle class. They were more travelled than ordinary black folk of that era and also came into contact with a much wider diversity of people – particularly if you compare them to share-croppers in the Deep South. They instilled a work ethic in their families; sons could inherit the positions of their fathers. There was a price to this as the author points out. The Pullman porters hid behind a mask – smiling and shining sho [...]

My great-grandfather, who died long before I was born, was a Pullman Porter. I was so happy to find a book dedicated to the lives of these upstanding men, many of whom were the first to leave the farms in the South and went on to help create the black middle class. Five stars!

Really enjoyed this book. I thought it was well researched, particularly in light of the difficulty in finding living Pullman Porters and setting up opportunities for oral testimony/history with them. Its one of the particular joys of reading a history book when it covers something that is seemingly forgotten, and may only get a sentence, if that, in a normal history textbook. The transition of African-Americans who were slaves in the South to working on these luxury sleeping cars is fascinating [...]

Tye makes the case for the centrality of black Pullman (sleeping car) porters to the development of the black middle class, labour history, and the civil rights movement. Lots I didn't know! I found the writing a little dull but it seemed well-researched and theirs is an important and interesting story. 3.5 stars.

Upon seeing the documentary, Rising From The Rails, I immediately wanted to read the book that was associated. Rarely is the history and significance of the Pullman Porter discussed and appreciated with American History. This book personalizes the challenges, struggles, indignities, and successes experienced by these beautiful group of men and the other auxiliary groups including women and other minorities working for the railroad at the end of the 19th century and 20th century. This book gives [...]

I enjoyed Rising from the Rails: Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class by Larry Tye. I have been reading much about Pullman Porters and Tye’s book is recent. He covers some of the familiar ground, such as the nature of the work and the discrimination built into job. We learn about the complexities of the work and what these men learn about negotiating in the White world. Many men used these skills to move into Civil Rights work, as the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters rep [...]

I thoroughly enjoyed this book about the Pullman Porters. The stories of organising a union in secrecy were fascinating and eye opening. It's a shame, to say the least, that there was not more about the women working on the railroad but it was good to see how women were absolutely vital to the initial organising of the union.Anything that tells the story of the vital contribution made by A Philip Randolph to trade unionism and to civil rights is fine by me but I was also pleased that the due res [...]

Some months ago, several of my friends from my Red Hat group went to a train museum in Kentucky. It was a really fun day and while we were there we watched a short film about the Pullman Porters who took care of the sleeper cars and their occupants them to a luxurious experience while traveling. Being a porter was an enviable job and basically led to a more middle class life for those who stayed with the job. Unfortunately, maintaining the job also meant taking much abuse from the wealthy white [...]

Well written and insightful, although it spends too much time on civil rights leader and pioneer A. Philip Randolph - a subject no doubt deserving its own book. The Pullman Porter was the connective tissue of the Black community, passing information, inspiration along as well as union pamphlets and activist literature. I wished the author spent more time profiling the outsized number of children and families that benefited having a Pullman Porter in their family.

Outstanding story of the role of the Pullman Porters in both the civil rights movement and the labor movement. A critical read about an important part of American history. Their sacrifices are mostly forgotten, but their impact on generations of African Americans (and workers in general) is significant.

Seattle Rep commissioned a work on the Pullman Porters which became the Pullman Porter Blues. My husband and I saw it and, of course, immediately became interested in the historical background. This book is a great one for that. It not only traces the history of George Pullman and his decision to use black porters (he hired ex-slaves because they were already subservient and, since they were black, they would not be threatening to white riders.) It's fascinating to find that former porters were [...]

A really great book about a part of American history that has never been covered. Well researched and able to include interviews from actual porters, it's a fascinating glimpse of America--especially the parts that are so often covered up: Robber barons, discrimination, lynchings, the extreme prejudices faced by blacks after the Civil War & for more than the next 100 years.Some interesting bits: * Some kids in 1918 lost their one and only baseball when it flew into the window of a Pullman ca [...]

Simultaneously romantic and gritty, journalist Tye's account digs into the paradoxical story of the Pullman porters and the almost forgotten role they played in the civil rights movement. On the one hand, the porters were thoroughly exploited by the Pullman company, with long hours and low pay relative to their fellow railroad workers. On the other, they were a beacon of upward mobility for their neighbors and a critical information network between black communities. If you believe that economic [...]

This book is good to very good but not great. It is a wonderful set of anecdotes about the resilience of Black people (and Black men in particular) in the face of very difficult circumstances. These stories of persecution and resilience are inspiring but there did not seem to be a realized thesis, that being that these men laid the foundation for the mondern civil rights movement. I would have liked to have seen more stories about the descendants of these Pullman portersbut it was still a good b [...]

*SNORE*great content. lullaby writing. if you are a history buff and have some no-doze or an unlimited supply of coffee on hand, have at it. otherwise, give to a friend with insomnia and they will be grateful to you for the instant cure.----------------------------------------------okay, so far, not horrible. but it still feels like homework. -----------------------------------------------i really don't want to read this, but it's the club's selection for january. we'll see. *eyeroll*

It probably took me over a month to finish this book. It nearly put me to sleep every time I picked it up. I found myself wanting to stop reading it many times but for some reason it kept calling me back. In the end it was a very intriguing and I feel like I learned a lot from it. I would only reccommend this book to someone who is interested in the history of the Pullman Porters or the Railways.

Given that this book is written when so many Pullman porters are no longer alive, this book seems to be as factual an account as possible. Fascinating, heartrending, uplifting. Slavery may technically have ended with the Emancipation Proclamation, but George Pullman found his own special way to keep it going. And yet it ended up benefiting so many people. A conundrum of a book, and an important piece of American history.

A suprisingly engaging history of the Pullman porters. This book has very little structure and the premise (that porters were a lynchpin of the civil rights movement and everything can be traced to Pullman porters) is unsupported, but the anectodes are interesting and the information is all completely new to me. It kept me reading, even when I was saying "oh, please" at some of the author's more sweeping pronouncements

Porters were generally African American and a few Asian men who were hired to assistant travelers on passenger trains. George Pullman’s company employed more black workers than any other corporation in the U.S. The book delves into the history of these men who were invisible yet always there to be “Ambassadors of Hospitality”, how they became unionized and Tye interviews a number of former employees and their grandchildren.

As they did in their work lives, Pullman Porters fade into the background of labor, civil rights, and railway history. Yet their impact and ties to these movements cannot be understated. This book is an excellent resource for revealing a network of connections as expansive as the rails the Porters rode.

TerrificTye is a wonderful social historian. The Pullman porters were an important if overlooked force for change. So glad I read this. (Mary: the guy who set the fire in Loving Frank had been a Pullman porter and got me interested in their story).

With any historical nonfiction, those of us who aren't historians ourselves sort of have to trust that it's an equitable treatment of the subject. I really hope this is because I found it fascinating and well-written.

Great history and perspective on the employment of blacks by the Pullman Train company.

This is a must read for anyone interested in one of the great labor movements in U.S. History.

A very interesting topic but it lost my attention for long stretches at a time.

I just couldn't get into this book. I heard a great review/story the other day about the book on NPR and went in w/ high hopes, but it just didn't pan out quick enough for me.

Excellent research done just in time to catch the few primary sources left. the romance of trains, the unchivalrous codes of the past, "masters" of the universe & more

Although this book was not exactly riveting, it was filled with interesting information about the Pullman company and Porters and their ties to the civil rights movement.


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    Published :2019-01-22T14:55:57+00:00